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Armstrong County Department of Public Safety

Welcome to Armstrong County Department of Public Safety website.  Inside you will find information about 9-1-1, Emergency Management and Hazardous Materials services in Armstrong County. We hope that you find this site an informative and enjoyable experience.  We welcome comments at any time.  Thank you for taking the time to look around.

 

 

For Information on how to obtain an Armstrong County Department of Public Safety ID for your department or agency, go to the resources tab and select the DPS Photo ID Program menu item.

 

Back to School Safety Tips from the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency and Armstrong County Public Safety

 

Back to School Safety It’s that time again!

Time to kick off another exciting and fun-filled school year. Even after your kids have walked out the door for the first day of classes, it is not too late to remind them how to get to and from school safely. The National Highway Traffic Safety Association (NHTSA) (https://www.nhtsa.gov/back-school-safety) reminds us that safety must be the first lesson of every new school year. Tragically, from 2006 to 2015 there were 301 school-age children (18 and younger) killed in school transportation-related crashes. It is important to share a few simple tips with kids to help them stay safe when traveling to and from school.

 

RIDING THE SCHOOL BUS

School buses are the safest way for children to travel to and from school. However, there are dangers when children are boarding and leaving the bus. Over the last decade, nearly two-thirds of school-age pedestrians fatally injured in school transportation-related crashes were struck by school buses or other vehicles when getting on or off a school bus.

Teach your child to always play it SAFE:

• Stay five steps away from the curb.

• Always wait for the bus driver to tell you when to board.

• Face forward after finding a seat on the bus.

• Exit the bus when it stops, look left-right-left, and take five steps from the bus to the curb

 

WALKING

Walking to school is great exercise and research shows that exercise is important for better grades. Children under 10 years old should be accompanied by an adult or someone who will make sure they walk safely. Generally, children over 10 are less impulsive and more attentive. Teach your child to always:

• Use the sidewalk whenever possible

• If there isn’t a sidewalk, walk on the edge of the street facing traffic.

• Focus when walking near traffic – this is no time for horseplay.

• Use crosswalks whenever they are available to cross the street.

• Look left-right-left before crossing any street.

 

BIKING

Kids love riding their bikes and it can be a fun, quick way to get to school. Be sure to do these simple things to keep your bike ride safe:

• Always wear a properly fitted helmet and securely fasten the chin strap.

• Ride in the same direction as traffic and follow traffic signs and signals.

• Stay in the bike lane whenever possible.

• Use the sidewalk appropriately and keep an eye out for other pedestrians.

• Never use electronics while riding – they are distracting.

 

DRIVING

For some teens, back to school also means the new-found freedom of driving. Research tells us that teens are the largest age group reported as distracted at the time of a fatal crash. Texting is clearly a dangerous distraction. Sending or reading a text takes your eyes off the road for five seconds on average, and at 55 mph, that is equivalent to driving the length of an entire football field with your eyes closed. In 2015 alone, 3,477 people were killed, and 391,000 were injured in motor vehicle crashes involving distracted drivers.

Keep these things in mind when driving to keep your ride safe:

• Have a safe driver behind the wheel.

• The car shouldn’t move until everyone is buckled up.

• Use appropriate car seats and booster seats for younger passengers, and remember: every child under 13 must ride in the back seat—no exceptions.

• Finally, remember that the phone stays down when you’re driving.

 

Pennsylvania's School Bus Stopping Law

• Motorists must stop at least 10 feet away from school buses that have their red lights flashing and stop arm extended.

• Motorists must stop when they are behind a bus, meeting the bus or approaching an intersection where a bus is stopped.

• Motorists following or traveling alongside a school bus must also stop until the red lights have stopped flashing, the stop arm is withdrawn, and all children have reached safety.

• If physical barriers such as grassy medians, guide rails, or concrete median barriers separate oncoming traffic from the bus, motorists in the opposing lanes may proceed without stopping.

• Do not proceed until all the children have reached a place of safety.

The penalties if convicted of violating Pennsylvania's School Bus Stopping Law include:

• $250 fine

• Five points on your driving record

• 60-day license suspension

For more information, review Pennsylvania's School Bus Stopping Law Fact Sheet.

(http://www.dot.state.pa.us/Public/DVSPubsForms/BDL/BDL%20Publications/Pub%2097.pdf)

 

National Night Out

National Night Out (NNO) is an annual community-building campaign that promotes positive police-community partnerships and neighborhood camaraderie to make our neighborhoods safer, more caring places to live.

How do you find out about National Night Out in your community? Contact your local law enforcement agency.

For more information on National Night Out or to register your event for free, visit the NATW website at https://natw.org.

 

Labor Day Campaign to Stop Drunk Driving (August 17th through September 3rd)

Summer’s nearly over, and the Labor Day holiday might be your last chance to enjoy warm weather fun. Let’s make sure we’re enjoying it safely. Whether you’re driving to a cookout, the beach, or on a family trip: Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over. As the Labor Day holiday is one of the most dangerous on our roads, state and local law enforcement will be making a special effort leading up to and throughout the Labor Day holiday to protect us all from drunk drivers.

No matter where you drive in the United States, it is illegal to drive with a blood alcohol concentration of .08 or higher. Yet every year, about one-third of all deaths on our roads involve drunk drivers.In 2015 alone, 10,265 people were killed in drunk driving crashes - that’s one person killed every 51 minutes every day of the year.

If these cold hard facts don’t stop drunk driving, how about a nice set of cold hard steel handcuffs? That’s what you’ll be wearing this Labor Day holiday if you drink and drive. As Labor Day is one of the deadliest times of the year due to drunk driving, thousands of law enforcement agencies across America will be working to save lives by arresting drunk drivers. Your arrest not only comes with shame and embarrassment, but with up to $10,000 in fines, increased insurance costs, and other expenses.

In this day and age, there’s no excuse for drinking and driving. Not when smartphones put a sober ride at your fingertips. With a ride sharing app or a quick call for taxi or a local sober ride program, you can stay safe, protect others and avoid arrest. We’ve made it as easy as ever with NHTSA’s SaferRide app, which can help you find your local cab company’s number or send your location to a friend so they can come pick you up. The app is available for Android devices on Google Play, and Apple devices on the iTunes store.

Our attitudes and actions have to change when it comes to drunk driving. It begins with all of us and how we treat our friends and neighbors. If you choose to drink and drive - and it is a choice - you risk not only your own life but the lives of innocent people in your community. The Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over high-visibility enforcement campaign is your community saying loud and clear that drunk drivers will pay before they cost your community another life.

So, remember, this Labor Day and every day:

Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over!

For more information, visit the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration at:

http://www.nhtsa.gov

 

Drought Preparedness Tips

With a rather wet summer in 2018, drought may be the last thing on your mind. However, just as heavy rain storms can set us up for flooding, a slight shift in the pattern can lead to drier than normal conditions and drought. A drought can last a period of weeks to months, or even several years and have devastating impacts on people, animals, crops, and more.

In the 1990s and into the early 2000s, Pennsylvania experienced some of its most prolonged droughts in recent history. If conditions become favorable for a drought, the PA Department of Environment Protection (www.DEP.pa.gov) may issue a drought watch, warning, or emergency which calls for water conservation by all.

Regardless of wet or dry conditions, we should always be conscious of the water we use each day. Developing good water habits now will make it much easier to adapt when a drought develops. Here are a few tips from www.Ready.PA.gov on what you can do every day to conserve water before a drought.

GENERAL

• Repair dripping faucets by replacing washers.

• Check plumbing for leaks and have any repaired.

• Retrofit faucets by installing aerators with flow restrictors.

• Insulate your water pipes to reduce heat loss and prevent them from breaking due to freezing.

• Choose appliances that are more energy and water efficient.

• Use mulch to retain moisture in the soil.

• Plant native and drought-tolerant grasses, ground covers, shrubs, and trees.

• Consider rainwater harvesting to water plants.

• Never pour water down the drain, use it to water your indoor plants or garden.

BATHROOM

• Consider purchasing a low-volume toilet that uses less than half the water of older models.

• Place a one-gallon plastic jug of water into the tank to displace toilet flow to cut down on the amount of water needed to flush.

• Replace your showerhead with an ultra-low-flow version.

LAWN CARE

• Position sprinklers so water lands on the lawn and shrubs and not on paved areas.

• Check sprinkler systems and timing devices regularly to be sure they operate properly.

• Raise the lawn mower blade to at least three inches or to its highest level. A higher cut encourages grass roots to grow deeper, shades the root system, and holds soil moisture.

• Plant drought-resistant lawn seed.

• Avoid over-fertilizing your lawn. Applying fertilizer increases the need for water.

POOL

• Install a new water-saving pool filter. A single back flushing with a traditional filter uses 180 to 250 gallons of water.

• Cover pools and spas to reduce evaporation of water.

 

 

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